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The Horse Portrait: A History
The Horse Portrait: A History
by Lyne Raff 
Editor/Publisher 

     The horse: symbol of status in ancient cultures worldwide.  Primitive Man watched the horses that ran wild on the prehistoric plains: he exalted them in paintings on the walls of caves, then caught them to keep with him.  Steppes nomads immortalized horses in their art and jewelry.  A man on horseback was the master of his world, at a time when life was at the whim of such forces as the weather, the successful harvest, or the mood of whatever powerful army was nearby.   
     He who had the horse had control...

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 Above: Flight Without Wings, and Vision: the Pastels of Kim McElroy

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Chariots of the Pharoahs:  Horses of Ancient Egypt 
Chariots of the Pharoahs:  Horses of Ancient Egypt 
by Lyne Raff 
Editor/Publisher 

     In our mind's eye, when we picture a War Horse, most people usually think of the knights and their armored horses of medieval times.  But it was much earlier-nearly a thousand years-that the war horse had appeared in battle.  As far back as the 3rd to 2nd millennia B.C., equids had already been drawing the battle wagons and early wheeled war vehicles of the ancient world. 
     From the very beginning, a horse was an animal that represented prestige.  They were used as gifts between heads of state, and as key figures in religious and social ceremonies.  And, as soon as man began to recognize the horse's usefulness, it became one of the most important prizes in the spoils of war. 
     On many of the carved and painted surfaces on the walls of Egypt's tombs, chariot horses sweep into battle.  The horse of ancient Egypt was primarily a chariot animal, rather than one to be ridden.  Their strong, arched necks, flagged tails, and proud profiles are unmistakable; even a modern horseman can easily recognize these horses as predecessors of today's Arabian and Barb horses... 

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 Above:  The Horse in Chinese Sculpture, and Tony Stromberg: Return to Freedom

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Cavalia
(these images courtesy Cavalia and Frederic Chehu)
Cavalia:  L'Amour et Le Respect 
by Shannon Southard 
Senior Staff writer  

     Love and Respect. 
     Not just mere technical terminology, but rather a mantra, essential components in the partnership between human and horse.  They are not vocabulary words thrown 'round lightly, but the doctrine of a way of life chosen and practiced daily, establishing a remarkable unbreakable link between man and beast.  It is a bond producing trust and mutual friendship twixt the two, and a better, dare we say the best, way to bridge the gap with adoration and communication, over brutish conquest and domination.  A glimmer of understanding seldom seen throughout time's long standing connection of man and horse.  Yet now, it flickers solid here before us today through the dedication of Frederic Pignon and Magali Delgado, the majesty of their cast of gorgeous equines--and for all of those who believe...Cavalia. 
    You will have expectations.  They will be surpassed. 
 
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The Scythians: War, Horse, and Art of the Steppes Nomads
The Scythians: War, Horse, and Art of the Steppes Nomads
by Lyne Raff 
Editor/Publisher 

     The mounted nomads of the steppes charged into infamy like no one else.
     At the time that it happened, the skill of riding represented an unprecedented leap forward for mankind.  With a speed previously unknown, a whole new way of existence emerged; people once accustomed to village life, or to the unchanging patterns of life bordered within the hard-won rows of subsistence farms, found their horizons opening like an infinity before them.  Thanks to the horse, Man could now move quickly, whenever and wherever he wished.  And that freedom gave early riders not only a profound new mobility, but a bold new attitude.  They were reborn from their previous lives as subsistence farmers into advanced--even infamous--rulers of their domain.  
     The age of the horsemen had begun.

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