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Visitor: the photographs of Edward S. Curtis
Visitor: the photographs of Edward S. Curtis
by Lyne Raff 
Editor/Publisher 

     Just after the turn of the century, Edward Curtis was probably one of the most important photographers in the world.  But at the time, his skill as a photographer took second place to his authority on the subject of the cultures of the American Indian.
     His work, when it finally was viewed by the public, was seen as through a scientific eye.  Generally speaking, though it did win awards worldwide, his photographs were of anthropological value more than they were art.

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The History of the Horse Show
The History of the Horse Show
by Lyne Raff 
Editor/Publisher 

     The modern horse show is a combination of two kinds of celebrations that have been taking place for hundreds of years--the military tournament, and the local fair.
     In ancient times, while civilians traded horses at local seasonal meets, armies of the Greeks, Romans, Scythains, Egyptians, Hittites, Chinese, and Persians all held rigorous cavalry or chariot competitions amont their rich traditions.
     Centuries later, so did the Cossacks, the Hussars, the Rajput, and the Turks, as well as cavalry active until World War I.  For the Cavalryman of any period in history, the quality of his horse and the skill with which he rode his mount was paramount; as armies gathered or stood watiting for orders, soldiers would compare their own horses with those of their comrades.  When times were good, and there was little warring to be done, entire companies of men might hold horsemanship competitons to beat back the boredom.

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The Horsemen: Agent John Barletta and President Ronald Reagan
The Horsemen: Agent John Barletta
and President Ronald Reagan

by Lyne Raff 
Editor/Publisher 

     They suround the President, but they are virtually invisible.  They are the Secret Service--the 2,000 men and women in suits and earpieces, each assigned to a specific area, who move with important elected officials, such as the President.  They protect them in any situation, and would lay down their lives if necessary.
     The Secret Service moves the President around; they secure the places he will be.  They accompany him on every aspect of his public life--and most of his private time as well.
     In the fall of 1980, Ronald Reagan was elected President of the United States.  When the agents begin their service of protecting someone, it is in their code of honor to intrude as little as possible into the life and activities of that person; they pride themselves on this.  They protect him no matter where he is and no matter what he does.  But as far as the Secret Service was concerned, Ronald Reagan did the most dangerous thing he could have done--he climbed onto a thousand-pound animal and rode it around.
 

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Highest Honor: The Caisson Platoon of Arlington Cemetery
Highest Honor: The Caisson Platoon of Arlington Cemetery
by Lyne Raff 
Editor/Publisher 

     "Good morning, welcome to Fort Myer," Staff Sergeant Maskey says cheerfully.  "Follow me." 
     It is 4:30am on a Friday morning in early November, and unusually cold.  SSG Maskey leads the way to a brightly lit barn, where he and about a dozen other soldiers have already been at work for half an hour.  The air sparks with busy energy and there is much to do this morning--there are stalls to clean and horses to groom, saddles, wagons, and hardware to polish, and literally hundreds of feet of harness to inspect and to clean.
     And then, after that, the men must prep their own uniforms, pressing their blue wool dress jackets and polishing their boots and spurs to a mirror shine.

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